Prenuptial Agreements

Get-Refusal and the Agreement for Mutual Respect: Israel Today

Ḥakirah, the Flatbush Journal of Jewish Law and Thought
2010
9

 Rabbinical Court Advocate, Rachel Levmore, is the coordinator for and -refusal for the Council of Young Israel  Rabbis in Israel and the Jewish Agency.  She reviews the halakhic problems with get-refusal and the implementation of prenuptial agreements in the rabbinic court system in Israel today.   She also gives an extensive overview of the existing literature on the topic, especially within the Israeli court system.

Rabbinic Responses in Favor of Prenuptial Agreements

Tradition
Spring
2009
42

Rabbinical Court Advocate Rachel Levmore seeks to inform the public about the extent of acceptance, amongst the rabbinical world, of prenuptial agreements designed to prevent the phenomenon of get-refusal. She presents a number of relevant responsa, dating from the mid-20th century to the present, offering direct access to information and sources which have, to date, been largely concealed from the public eye or ignored.  She concludes by reiterating the value of signing the Agreement for Mutual Respect, of which she is one of the authors. 

Get-Refusal and the Agreement for Mutual Respect: Israel Today

Ḥakirah, the Flatbush Journal of Jewish Law and Thought
2010
9

Rabbinical Court Advocate, Rachel Levmore, is the coordinator for Iggun and Get-refusal for the Council of Young Israel  Rabbis in Israel and the Jewish Agency.  She reviews the halakhic problems with get-refusal and the implementation of prenuptial agreements in the rabbinic court system in Israel today.   She also gives an extensive overview of the existing literature on the topic, especially within the Israeli court system.

Training the Next Generation--Youth involvement in the Shaarei Tefillah Women’s Tefillah Group

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 4:05pm -- rootuser

By Joanne Kamens Niewood

Shaarei TefillahOne of the first special events of the Shaarei Tefillah Women’s Tefillah Group (WTG) was a Bat Mitzvah. Since that time, girls and young women in our kahal (congregation) have actively participated in many aspects of ritual including leading Shabbat services, reading Torah, participating in a women’s Simchat Torah service, and reading from Megilot Esther, Eichah and Ruth. We have also developed an innovative Bat Mitzvah tutoring program where older girls (15 and older) have the opportunity to teach the younger girls for their B'not Mitzvah.  We are currently exploring ways to expand the WTG’s community activities beyond ritual, and into other areas such as learning. This will likely give more girls (and women) a chance to participate after Bat Mitzvah.  Not all girls (just like not all boys) enjoy the public performance aspect of leading a service or chanting from the Torah.  While we are advocates of teaching all girls to read and appreciate the Torah trope, in my opinion, we will do well to find ways for the girls that don’t enjoy that aspect of synagogue involvement to participate in other ways with the WTG community of women.

One Small Step for a Feminist, One Giant Leap for Womankind

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 4:05pm -- rootuser

By Eden Farber

A crisp fall morning. A march of beautiful, resonating voices. Joyous celebratory dancing. Tears; tears of both simhah and longing for more. One Torah reading by women, for women. 

TorahFor the first time ever, this year my shul held a for-women-by-women Torah reading for Simhat Torah. Practicing with the Torah the day before yom tov, I was excited to have the opportunity to leyn again—this was something I’ve done before and feel is one of my most connected religious experiences. Yet what made me emotional was not when I stood at the Torah—but when my mother did. Hearing her read from the Torah for the first time in her entire life—her perfect cantilation, her poise—I just stood there, in front of the entire group, and cried. My Ima, reading the Torah—it was then that I realized how important this really was. This was about mothers showing daughters, daughters showing mothers that religion is for us, too. Three generations of women would read Torah the next day—bonding and uniting with each other through this incredible religious experience of reciting the words of our God.

First Women’s Tefillah Group at The Hampton Synagogue

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 4:05pm -- rootuser

By Chavie Kahn

The Hampton Synagogue in Westhampton Beach, New York held its first Women’s Tefillah Group on August 18, 2012 in celebration of my daughter Sarina Kofman’s Bat Mitzvah.  In short, a part of my Jewish dream for my daughter came true.

My daughter had the opportunity to leyn for the first time in her life, as did I. As it was both Rosh Chodesh Elul and Shabbat, Sarina chanted Hallel andleyned the first aliyah of Parashat Re’eh, the maftir aliyah for Rosh Chodesh and the haftarah for Rosh Chodesh.   The remainder of the aliyot were chanted by close female family members and friends. 

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